Incredible New Photographs Emerge Of Ancient Amazonian Tribe Isolated From Civilization

The life of an uncontacted indigenous tribe in a remote region of the Amazon rainforest was captured by Brazilian photographer Ricardo Stuckert. It’s hard to believe that today, with all of the technology and evolution, there are people still living completely isolated. Proofs of these protected Indians, who are completely disconnected from us, started emerging in 2008. A bird’s-eye view of the tribe and the island reveals a lifestyle in which they aren’t bothered by time or greed.





The Amazonian tribe live in a jungle in Jordao, close to the Brazil-Peru border. High-resolution images were captured by Ricardo Stuckert from a low-flying helicopter. National Geographic published the images first, providing a never before seen view of a lost Neolithic way of life.

Ricardo Stuckert/Independent/Creative Commons

The photographs give us a glimpse into a life of complete isolation. Details of intricate body paints, haircuts, clothing style and choice of weapons can also be seen. José Carlos Meirelles, who has been working with and studying the indigenous tribe for more than 40 years, explained to National Geographic that this could be the same group that was spotted back in 2008 in a different location. They are believed to be migrating every couple of years from parts of the forest to another.

They avoid any other human contact and threaten to kill anyone entering their territory. In one of the pictures, a tribesman can be spotted with a bow and arrow, threatening the low-flying helicopter.




Ricardo Stuckert/National Geographic/Creative Commons

In 2008 and 2010, the same group was spotted by Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency in different parts of the forest. According to Stuckert, who captured the photographs, the tribe was more curious than scared. They are a small group of people who have settlements around different parts of the forest. Illegal miners and loggers are a huge threat to these people.

These indigenous people have limited or no contact with the outside world. To protect their lifestyle and eliminate the threat of illegal miners and loggers, a law was passed in the 1990’s. Before the law was passed, it is estimated that around 20% of the tribe fell due to sickness spread by the trespassers.

Ricardo Stuckert/National Geographic/Creative Commons

When Stuckert boarded the helicopter in search of the tribes people, severe thunderstorms forced them to take an alternative route. Luckily, the crew flew right on top of the tribe, finding huts at the heart of the jungle. Upon seeing the approaching aircraft, the indigenous tribe scattered everywhere.




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